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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 9:33 pm 
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Hypessobrycon bentosi (AKA White tipped Rosy, False Rosy or Ornate Tetra) is another fish found in the altum habitat.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 1:00 pm 
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Now when a young Pterophyllum, is trying to eat an "otto" there is clearly a feading problem... i've got wild-peruvians, and also rednoses... Cleary they dont eat those little ones... perhaps you need to give more "food"... as peaces of freshwatershrimps, musquito-larva's, etc... You're fish are to hungry!!!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 2:19 pm 
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Aquanaut wrote:
Now when a young Pterophyllum, is trying to eat an "otto" there is clearly a feading problem... i've got wild-peruvians, and also rednoses... Cleary they dont eat those little ones... perhaps you need to give more "food"... as peaces of freshwatershrimps, musquito-larva's, etc... You're fish are to hungry!!!


That is not quite a fair assessment. Altums are skilled fish eaters and they need not have to be very hungry. They are simply opportunistic and will eat out of irresistable reflex. There is also the little matter of fish that are very visual feeders only have one way to test out what might appear to be something good to eat; pick it up/inhale a potentential food item. In some cases this may be an Otocinclus. I have no doubt but more than a few in the wild make this same mistake and die sometimes from it.
This is no different than a Great White biting a surfer mistaking it for a seal or a trout taking a fly or lure.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 2:31 pm 
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Bad photos of a good fish, Hyphessobrycon "colombianus"
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Image

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 11:26 pm 
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Hi Aquanaut, it could be true in the case of tank raised altum, ocassionally available in Europe through the Linke lines, and maybe some others, that the prey instinct has been curbed by effect of having been completely raised in an aquarium. But when dealing with wild Altum, this is not the case, these fish eat P. axelrodi, H. rhodostomus and similar sized characins (especially when under 3/4 inch / +/- 2cm) as part of their diet in nature. When they see these fish in an aquarium, it is hard for them to resist. They can be very well nurtured with the best quality frozen or fresh foods and once the lights go out, they will silently sail towards their dormant victim and with an interesting suction reflex will ingest the small fish. I must say I have never seen myself (in well fed altum) that they try eating the smaller fish with lights on, but at lights off, give them a while and watch.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 11:44 pm 
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Also Aquanaut, you might want to consider that the Peruvian Altum (P. scalare, from Rio Nanay) comes from a very different environment than that of Orinoco P. altum. The former I understand is much richer in plant diversity and hence, both vegetable and animal matter as food sources. The Orinoco habitat where P. altum comes from is virtually devoid of plants (in comparison to the Amazon habitat) and fish are basically of a carnivore nature. Even the plecos (i.e. L128, L200) of the immediate habitat rely on very small crustaceans and other life forms that can adhere to the stones in the rapid water (stomach contents on these two species at least, is mineral and zooplankton origin with some algae). When I say immediate habitat, I mean rapid water next to or very close to the slower water in which P. altum can be found.

To a point, it would make sense that your Peruvian's do not eat smaller fish... I have never seen other P. scalare (well fed) eating smaller fish. As you can see my friend, there is a lot of difference between P. altum and the other species in the genus than meets the eye.

Ed

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 11:53 pm 
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BTW, if we'd like to discuss the matter of the fish eating preferences we might want to post under the Diert & Nutrition Topic. I'll be reposting my last posts in that section.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:05 am 
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puertoayacucho wrote:
Also Aquanaut, you might want to consider that the Peruvian Altum (P. scalare, from Rio Nanay) comes from a very different environment than that of Orinoco P. altum. The former I understand is much richer in plant diversity and hence, both vegetable and animal matter as food sources. The Orinoco habitat where P. altum comes from is virtually devoid of plants (in comparison to the Amazon habitat) and fish are basically of a carnivore nature. Even the plecos (i.e. L128, L200) of the immediate habitat rely on very small crustaceans and other life forms that can adhere to the stones in the rapid water (stomach contents on these two species at least, is mineral and zooplankton origin with some algae). When I say immediate habitat, I mean rapid water next to or very close to the slower water in which P. altum can be found.

To a point, it would make sense that your Peruvian's do not eat smaller fish... I have never seen other P. scalare (well fed) eating smaller fish. As you can see my friend, there is a lot of difference between P. altum and the other species in the genus than meets the eye.

Ed

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