re: blk. Morpho Tetras

#2
I am not 100% sure what you mean by blk morpho tetra, but if it is Poecilocharax weitzmani then i have kept them for some time, they will shoal when young and just introduced to the tank but once they settle after a couple of days they will behave like a dwarf cichlid, with the males setting up territories, displaying to the females and mock battles with the other males, they spawn in caves, so tubes, pipes or bamboo will do the trick, the males guard the eggs and fry till free swimming, males have amazing finnage and grow much larger than the females, the fry once free swimming are very hard to spot as they tend to remain hidden most of the time you will spot them more and more as they grow and pop in and out of the plants etc to grab at food, the young will also hide nearer the base of the tank if you have lots leaf litter, staring at the tank for a while you will spot them nipping from one hiding place to another as the search for food.
in my experience the food that they ate most was tetra prima.

re: blk. Morpho Tetras

#4
Yep, I would echo what Joe is saying, the males take up equidistant positions from each other and display everytime a female comes into their territory. A lovely little fish when kept in very low mineral content water. I suspect that there are several very similar species/races. But not a shoaler as such.

re: blk. Morpho Tetras

#5
rummy nosed tetras are hard to beat as a shoaling fish, but my other fav would be the ember tetra. a beautiful fish.
or a recent addition to my tank is a large shoal of Corydoras pygmae...... they are amazing to watch plus they tend to shoal in the mid to upper sections of the tank, whe one hits the surface for a gulp of air 40 or 50 more follow, real fun to watch

re: blk. Morpho Tetras

#6
I have kept Poeciliocharax weitzmani many times.
It took me many attempts to get a group which was in decent condition and those first several batches had big wipe outs. I finally acquired 25 health specimens and mine never did adapt to prepared foods although Bev Newcomer who sent them to me said hers did become accustomed to Newlife Spectrum granules, I believe.
I fed mine mainly Grindal worms, mosquito larvae in season and live black worms whenever I had them.
I kept them in a primarily species tank, a 20 gal long(12 X 12 X 30 inches).
The other fish were about 20 of the tiny Loricariidae catfish, Parotocinclus cf. eppelyi.
I provided Malyasian bog wood, a few short caves and small clay pots notched which I borrowed from Apistogramma setups. The tank became carpeted wall to wall with Java Moss. I rarely saw these Characins except during feeding time. They are very much like Apistogramma spp in their behaviors and very atypical Characins. The dominant males are spectacular when they are in full display mode.
I kept mine for two years in nearly straight RO water and the pH ranged between 4.5 and 5.0.
They are almost as if you amalgamated a Characin, Apistogramma and a Killiefish and got Black Darter Tetras. They share behaviors and appearances with all three other groups. They are most challenging at first because they apparently forage constantly so when they are starved and over crowded during their time in the distribution chain they are usually extremely run down. A further complication is that the larger and more aggressive males tend to outnumber the females among the survivors. I regard them as a specialty fish which is poorly suited for community tanks.

When it comes to shoaling fish my favorites are also Rummy Noses, Ember and Green Neons. When I set up my 125 gal as a planted community tank it included 25 Rummy Nose, 25 Ember and 100 Green Neons. Green Neons are the smallest among the Paracheirodon spp to my knowledge but en masse they make an impressive display and they share a tolerance for Discus warm temperatures unlike the common Neon and perhaps even better than Cardinals. I prefer to keep Green Neons with Discus over their relatives.
I wanted to set up a mass display of Ember Tetras almost 10 years ago.
I wasn't willing to buy that many so instead I bought 2 trios from the LFS, bred them and ended up with at least 200 Embers. In a larger planted tank that many Embers makes a beautiful display. They aren't too difficult to breed although you will get a better yield from a spawn started out on Infusoria before transitioning to newly hatched brine shrimp. Once on brine shrimp nauplii they grow rapidly and reach breeding age by about six months. I breed them in 4.5 gal tanks with a false screen bottom and artificial yarn breeding mops. It is always important to use as clean environment as possible when breeding Tetras if you desire a good yield.
Larry Waybright
Trout fly fisherman.
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