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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 8:41 pm 
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I just get another batch of 10 wild caught baby Altums from John this year.
They are bigger than last year's.

But, not sure if it's the quality of the fish or my water condition is not as good as last year. They are streesed.
On day one, they are glass surfing against one corner of the tank. Fins are clamped.
now it's day 4, things are better. But, they are still glass surfing against the front glass. Find are looked better also.

Water is zero ammonia and zero no2. No3 is a little bit high around 80.
Fishes are eating OK.

Anyone experience the similar stuff?
Should I do water change to bring down no3 level?(may stress the fish more)

Or, Keep observe without any action?


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 12:02 pm 
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Hi,

Not sure what you mean by glass surfing. Can u post a photo or short video?

Cheers


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:59 pm 
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They are still swimming against the water flow or glass.
They do eat. Fins are dissolved.
I have decided to do regular water changes. Looks like they react well to the water change process.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2016 10:00 am 
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Hi RCG, I have seen what I guess we could call "glass surfing" among new younger wild altum imports. I would describe this as huddling all tightly in a corner of the tank; for some reason they prefer one of the front corners to do this. They might go up and down, from one side to the other, but always together. Is this kind of what you mean?

If they are responding well to water changes, by all means keep doing them. You may want to keep them with the lights off to see if that helps.

Take in mind that young wild altums prefer water that is similar to their natural habitat. You can gradually adjust them to tap, or a mix, but they should be received in an aquarium with their natural water values**.

---

[b]** Wild altum, though originating from very soft water where the pH averages 4.5-5.5, will many times have been kept in higher pH, hard water, by the importer or seller. I have know of some importers simply plopping these new arrivals into this hard and high pH water. This is a very bad practice and really stresses up the fish. We end up paying the consequences.

It would be really beneficial to try and replicate the importer/seller's water to receive the fish and do a gradual water change for the first couple of days to get them back to their natural conditions. This will help them recover sooner. Once the fish are behaving normal, eating well, and looking in good health, after a couple of months, then you want to to take them to mixed or tap water and finish raising them in that water.
In a few years, when they are of full adult size, try a big water change with water prepared to their natural source conditions and you may get a very nice surprise.


---

And please read our feeding threads.

Good luck,

Ed [/b]

_________________
God listens. He may not always give you everything you want, when you want it; but he always gives you what you really need, when you need it most!
E.R.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2016 10:28 am 
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Hi jimmy1,

Sorry, did not get a chance to take a video. I will see if I can take a video when they fully recovered.

Hi puertoayacucho,

I guess what you described is what I mean here.

They are getting better now.However, I lost one yesterday due to ascites.
The others are still doing fine. But, I don't think they are fully recovered yet. Some of them are covered with white stuff.

This year is not good as last year, I remember last year they all recovered in very good condition just in one week.

The water condition is quite stable if I do not do water change.
80F and 5.3 PH

But, if I do water change the ph may go above to around 5.9 and then bring down to 5.3. (I use ph controller to control a filter contains peat to bring down the ph)

That is why I am asking for advice here:
Basically: PH float VS. High NO3

I am trying to setup a system to prepare enough water similar to the tank water for changes. But, still no done yet.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2016 1:30 pm 
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Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
rgc588 wrote:
Hi jimmy1,

Sorry, did not get a chance to take a video. I will see if I can take a video when they fully recovered.

Hi puertoayacucho,

I guess what you described is what I mean here.

They are getting better now.However, I lost one yesterday due to ascites.
The others are still doing fine. But, I don't think they are fully recovered yet. Some of them are covered with white stuff.

This year is not good as last year, I remember last year they all recovered in very good condition just in one week.

The water condition is quite stable if I do not do water change.
80F and 5.3 PH

But, if I do water change the ph may go above to around 5.9 and then bring down to 5.3. (I use ph controller to control a filter contains peat to bring down the ph)

That is why I am asking for advice here:
Basically: PH float VS. High NO3

I am trying to setup a system to prepare enough water similar to the tank water for changes. But, still no done yet.


Things you may consider:

1. Yes, find a way to prepare enough water of the same parameters for making water changes.
POSSIBLE SOLUTION. Plastic 55 gallon drum to precondition you water and once it is where you need it (pH and T wise) start your water change. Siphon 25% to 50% of your water out and pump the new preconditioned water in from the 55g drum. This is the simplest way I can think of. Later you can spend some time on a more automated option.

2. Add salt (kosher or sea salt from the supermarket will do) to the aquarium. This will not alter pH or hardness, or minimally.

3. That the pH goes up or down during the changes, as long as the changes aren't drastic is not critical. Of course you don't want to drift into the alkaline range (7.0 or above), as this could create a more toxic environment by allowing ammonium to convert to its toxic form. If you are in the pH 5 range during and after water change I would't worry.

_________________
God listens. He may not always give you everything you want, when you want it; but he always gives you what you really need, when you need it most!
E.R.


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