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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 12:13 pm 
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Location: Davis, CA
I checked my nitrates today and they were a bit higher than I wanted. I got them down to about 20 PPM after a 65% water change. I fertilized with Osmocote plus about 2 weeks ago. I must admit I have been feeding a bit too much, which I'll cut back on.

My question is, what levels have you seen you altum tolerate? Will a constant high nitrate level stunt growth? I haven't seen my fish act "off".


• Pre-Water Change - 50-60 PPM
• Post Water Change - 30 - 40 PPM
• Tap Water - 20-30 PPM.


Variables for increase:
• Osmocote Plus Fertlizer
• 5" Royal Pleco Addition
• Feeding plankton & flakes twice per day


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2015 6:09 am 
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The nitrate level coming from your tap seems high. The EPA safe drinking water act places the maximum target at 10ppm. See below. Maybe your test kit is not giving you the correct reading? I myself have no indication of nitrate levels of a measurable amount coming from the tap. Our water change routine keeps our nitrates down to about 5 to 10 ppm, so I have no experience with long term exposure to elevated nitrate levels but I can't imagine there wouldn't be some sort of damage going on?


What are EPA's drinking water regulations for nitrate?
In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act. This law requires EPA to determine the level of contaminants in drinking water at which no adverse health effects are likely to occur. These non-enforceable health goals, based solely on possible health risks and exposure over a lifetime with an adequate margin of safety, are called maximum contaminant level goals (MCLG). Contaminants are any physical, chemical, biological or radiological substances or matter in water.

The MCLG for nitrate is 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. EPA has set this level of protection based on the best available science to prevent potential health problems. EPA has set an enforceable regulation for nitrate, called a maximum contaminant level (MCL), at 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. MCLs are set as close to the health goals as possible, considering cost, benefits and the ability of public water systems to detect and remove contaminants using suitable treatment technologies. In this case, the MCL equals the MCLG, because analytical methods or treatment technology do not pose any limitation.

The Phase II Rule , the regulation for nitrate, became effective in 1992. The Safe Drinking Water Act requires EPA to periodically review the national primary drinking water regulation for each contaminant and revise the regulation, if appropriate. EPA reviewed nitrate as part of the Six Year Review and determined that the 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCLG and 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCL for nitrate are still protective of human health.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2015 7:19 am 
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Location: Davis, CA
FancyFins wrote:
The nitrate level coming from your tap seems high. The EPA safe drinking water act places the maximum target at 10ppm. See below. Maybe your test kit is not giving you the correct reading? I myself have no indication of nitrate levels of a measurable amount coming from the tap. Our water change routine keeps our nitrates down to about 5 to 10 ppm, so I have no experience with long term exposure to elevated nitrate levels but I can't imagine there wouldn't be some sort of damage going on?


What are EPA's drinking water regulations for nitrate?
In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act. This law requires EPA to determine the level of contaminants in drinking water at which no adverse health effects are likely to occur. These non-enforceable health goals, based solely on possible health risks and exposure over a lifetime with an adequate margin of safety, are called maximum contaminant level goals (MCLG). Contaminants are any physical, chemical, biological or radiological substances or matter in water.

The MCLG for nitrate is 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. EPA has set this level of protection based on the best available science to prevent potential health problems. EPA has set an enforceable regulation for nitrate, called a maximum contaminant level (MCL), at 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. MCLs are set as close to the health goals as possible, considering cost, benefits and the ability of public water systems to detect and remove contaminants using suitable treatment technologies. In this case, the MCL equals the MCLG, because analytical methods or treatment technology do not pose any limitation.

The Phase II Rule , the regulation for nitrate, became effective in 1992. The Safe Drinking Water Act requires EPA to periodically review the national primary drinking water regulation for each contaminant and revise the regulation, if appropriate. EPA reviewed nitrate as part of the Six Year Review and determined that the 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCLG and 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCL for nitrate are still protective of human health.



Our water quality report states that the range could be high. We're all on wells in the heart of the sacramento farmland. Just look at this report. It's horrible water for South Americans. http://water.cityofdavis.org/Media/Recycling/Documents/PDF/PW/Water/Water-Quality/Davis%20CCR%202013%20FINAL.pdf


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2015 2:09 pm 
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Is there any chance of using rain water in your region?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 10:58 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 3:38 pm
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Location: Alaska
Lilhelper wrote:
FancyFins wrote:
The nitrate level coming from your tap seems high. The EPA safe drinking water act places the maximum target at 10ppm. See below. Maybe your test kit is not giving you the correct reading? I myself have no indication of nitrate levels of a measurable amount coming from the tap. Our water change routine keeps our nitrates down to about 5 to 10 ppm, so I have no experience with long term exposure to elevated nitrate levels but I can't imagine there wouldn't be some sort of damage going on?


What are EPA's drinking water regulations for nitrate?
In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act. This law requires EPA to determine the level of contaminants in drinking water at which no adverse health effects are likely to occur. These non-enforceable health goals, based solely on possible health risks and exposure over a lifetime with an adequate margin of safety, are called maximum contaminant level goals (MCLG). Contaminants are any physical, chemical, biological or radiological substances or matter in water.

The MCLG for nitrate is 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. EPA has set this level of protection based on the best available science to prevent potential health problems. EPA has set an enforceable regulation for nitrate, called a maximum contaminant level (MCL), at 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. MCLs are set as close to the health goals as possible, considering cost, benefits and the ability of public water systems to detect and remove contaminants using suitable treatment technologies. In this case, the MCL equals the MCLG, because analytical methods or treatment technology do not pose any limitation.

The Phase II Rule , the regulation for nitrate, became effective in 1992. The Safe Drinking Water Act requires EPA to periodically review the national primary drinking water regulation for each contaminant and revise the regulation, if appropriate. EPA reviewed nitrate as part of the Six Year Review and determined that the 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCLG and 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCL for nitrate are still protective of human health.



Our water quality report states that the range could be high. We're all on wells in the heart of the sacramento farmland. Just look at this report. It's horrible water for South Americans. http://water.cityofdavis.org/Media/Recycling/Documents/PDF/PW/Water/Water-Quality/Davis%20CCR%202013%20FINAL.pdf


Ouch! Any chance you could treat and store your tap water to get the nitrates down before your water changes? I have a 200 gallon vertical poly tank I had to use many years ago for RO system. I still hold on to it in case we ever move, right now my water is great, knock on wood.

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I believe in giving a person the tools they need to achieve success then getting out of the way so they can enjoy the fruits of their labor.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 9:57 pm 
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Eric, that tapwater ppm is quite high, do you add it directly to your tank? If so, your putting back half of what you take out.
Then you have a 5 inch Royal Pleco you added, if it eats well, it should be a "good source of nitrate", to put it decently.

You may have a dual issue among your tap water and that pleco, but I would resolve it through water changes.

That said, Osmocote is your magic word here. I did planted tanks for many years and I did them beautifully and I would never use this type of fertilizer for an aquarium. This stuff is designed for soil, in water it dissolves quickly and will throw your cycle off balance. Make sure your pH is well into the reasonable acid scale, because if alkaline, you can have ammonia and nitrite spikes and you can lose fish. Seachem Flourish tabs are designed for aquarium use and do a nice job, just bury them deep near the roots.

Ed

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2015 8:06 pm 
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Location: Davis, CA
puertoayacucho wrote:
Eric, that tapwater ppm is quite high, do you add it directly to your tank? If so, your putting back half of what you take out.
Then you have a 5 inch Royal Pleco you added, if it eats well, it should be a "good source of nitrate", to put it decently.

You may have a dual issue among your tap water and that pleco, but I would resolve it through water changes.

That said, Osmocote is your magic word here. I did planted tanks for many years and I did them beautifully and I would never use this type of fertilizer for an aquarium. This stuff is designed for soil, in water it dissolves quickly and will throw your cycle off balance. Make sure your pH is well into the reasonable acid scale, because if alkaline, you can have ammonia and nitrite spikes and you can lose fish. Seachem Flourish tabs are designed for aquarium use and do a nice job, just bury them deep near the roots.

Ed


Hey Ed,

Thank you for the input. There have been numerous articles stating osmocote plus wouldn't affect the water column too much. However, I guess this isn't worth the risk for my type of tank. Lesson learned again. It's all coming out tomorrow.

I was trying to minimize the amount of WC's since California's in a severe drought, but that can't happen anymore.


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