Re: Rooibos tea

#31
That's nice Chris, I think you will note more relaxed fish after 3 or 4 days. Mine were on the skittish size and they are now more calm and eating better.

I'm working on getting a good amount of catappa from Venezuela, or better said, somebody to bring it up to the U.S.

I did tell you that I did not bother to brew or boil my last addition (to my tank) of rooibos and peat moss, I simply but it in a fine mesh bag and stuffed it loosely down one of the overflow boxes. It works very quickly and I hope I can reuse the bag (and its contents) a few times more. The thing is I took it out after around 12-16 hours after I saw the nice whisky tint to the water and have it in my freezer. I'll be putting it back in after next water change (if necessary, according to my eyeball judgment of the color of the water column) and see hoe much more I can get from it. Also going to run a UV test to see how this stuff holds up against UV exposure. No Purigen for now of course as it will most likely take the out the phenols which is our major benefit from these supplements.

Ed
God listens. He may not always give you everything you want, when you want it; but he always gives you what you really need, when you need it most!
E.R.

Re: Rooibos tea

#32
Ed- I have been buying bagged rooibos for some time. I got tired of paying that cost.

I have considered what you did with the bag, but I think tea is safer for me. I do have a bag of alder cones in a filter, but they remain there 24/7. I say safe because I am prone to forgetting and I would hate to overdose the fish.

When I do a water change I premix water for tds and ph levels. i also add the tea at that time. When i pump it in the fish delight in swimming in it. often the new water is one full point lower in pH than the tank and it doesn't bother them at all- they seem to like it.

Maybe we can work a trade of catappas for tea?
What makes the common man uncommon is common sense.

Re: Rooibos tea

#33
Hi Guys,

Yesterday I visited the Sandveld area about 250 km north of Cape Town in which a lot of potatoes are grown and in which I do research on potato viruses, but the important thing is that this area is where rooibos tea is grown, so I purposely took some pics of a "plantation" of this tea. It actually looks pretty miserable, but these are the bushes planted in rows between the natural bush and a row of Californian pines that are also often planted in South Africa.
Image
A closer look would show you this spiky plant. The top of the plant was simply cut off to harvest the leaves and stems and this is what is used to produce the tea. Note that I am indicating the dark green bush, not the weeds growing on the ground.
Image
And even closer you can see thin leaves and thin stems. Please note, no pesticides and no herbicides, these plants are quite sensitive and if you would just touch them with a herbicide they would be stone dead straight away. What I am therefore saying is that this is a perfectly safe product to use for your fishes.
Image
Now you will at least know in what sort of a brew your altums are swimming around in!

Kind regards,

Dirk
Somerset West, South Africa

Re: Rooibos tea

#34
Nice post- it is always neat to see these sort of photos. It's one thing to put some teabags into water and another to see from where the stuff actually came. It is nothing like traditional tea plantations. This is why I keep watching those vids from the Atabapo and Simon Forkel's fish room.

I don't get to see this kind of stuff posted on most other fish related sites
What makes the common man uncommon is common sense.

Re: Rooibos tea

#35
Update. This time around I left the bag with rooibos and peat moss in the sump tank and for a longer time, several days, to see how dark the water would get. Yes it got dark, but around day 5 it got quite murky and cloudy in the tank, so I have taken out the bag and started a water change and UV in now on. Next time I'll take the bag out on day 3, like the first time.
Ed
Last edited by puertoayacucho on Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
God listens. He may not always give you everything you want, when you want it; but he always gives you what you really need, when you need it most!
E.R.

Re: Rooibos tea

#36
I think brewing it like tea is the easiest route. I have used bags so far. I have not started in with the huge bag yet, so I am not sure how I will mix the loose. I do have tea pots in which it could be done loose and I have tea balls too.
What makes the common man uncommon is common sense.

Re: Rooibos tea

#37
I am trying a little experiment with rooibos tea. I received some wild rams about three weeks ago and they have been doing great. Late last week I noted two whitest areas on one of the fins of one fish. Well two days ago I noted a whitest area on the fins of another fish. I tried a couple of large WCs but noted no improvement in the fish. So yesterday I added a good portion of rooibos tea to the rams water and this morning noticed that the whitest areas are small or gone. If this continues I expect to see all clear fins on the rams. I will report the results. Ed, if you read this it is another one of those gut things. :D
Pat
Your discus are talking to you.. Are you listening

Re: Rooibos tea

#39
TwoTankAmin wrote:For what it is worth, I have used rooibos to treat milder infections with some success. I am certain it is a better option than melafix.
Anything which is successful is better that meds. I have not heard good things about melafix.
Your discus are talking to you.. Are you listening

Re: Rooibos tea

#40
Yep, I haven't seen anything improve with melafix or any other melaleuca based product, well, except the smell of the tank!

I think I'll be brewing some rooibos in a while and color my tank tonight.

Ed
God listens. He may not always give you everything you want, when you want it; but he always gives you what you really need, when you need it most!
E.R.
cron