Re: Angelfish - the common name, where does it come from?

#2
mpedersen wrote:Putting this out to the community - with our forthcoming Angelfish edition, Amazonas Editor James Lawrence asked me if I knew where (and when) the term "Angelfish" was actually applied to Pterophyllum. Anyone here happen to know the answer?
I'll take a crack at it.

Ptero is a latin word meaning wings. Altum means height, deep, or deep water.

I guess that Angelfish might be a name developed to more easily market the fish.

Re: Angelfish - the common name, where does it come from?

#3
"Pterophyllum" means "winged or feathered family" and yes, it refers to the high and long dorsal and anal fins common to all the species within the genus. Therefore we have that the feather wings related to our conception of angels, so we have "angelfish"

"Altum" means High, Tall or Growing (Latin "altus", Spanish "alto", Italian "alto") referring to the higher depth in proportions (in relation to length) proper of this species.

"Scalare" means "to climb, or climbing", referring to the form in which the dorsal spines and rays climb from front to back, in the manner of a climbing ladder.

"Leopoldi" for King Leopold III of Belgium who collected the first known specimens.

Hope this helps.

Ed
God listens. He may not always give you everything you want, when you want it; but he always gives you what you really need, when you need it most!
E.R.

Re: Angelfish - the common name, where does it come from?

#4
In Spanish, we generally refer to all "angelfish" as simply "escalar" from (scalare).
In Venezuela we distinguish the altum as "escalar altum" (Germans say "altum skalare"). In Venezuela this is the only natural species of Pterophyllum that we have.
In Colombia, we naturally have both species and they are referred to as "escalar" (P. scalare) and "escalar altum" or simply "altum", for P.altum.
Ed
God listens. He may not always give you everything you want, when you want it; but he always gives you what you really need, when you need it most!
E.R.
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