Agression and Gender

#1
Hey all,

Just wondering if you've noticed any correlation between gender and aggression? Over the past 10-15 years keeping discus, its always seemed like (in my tanks) the females are the ones who are the most aggressive, stake out their territory, and then court the male....and then once courted the male ramps up his aggression. Maybe its a freak thing for me and doesn't hold water with anyone else...but its just come across that way in my tanks. Has anyone noticed any patterns like this for angels? Specifically wild angels.

The reason I ask is 2 of my SI angels (the two largest) have really been going at it lately. Marking out territories and really defending them from each other. Its like a shake, jab, shake, jab lol. Its definitely fighting and not courting. I would suspect they are the same sex hence the two distinct territories and fighting, but wasn't sure what sex.

Trying to get a video of it to show. No fish is getting harmed or bullied to the point of stress so I don't mind the aggression, I was just curious if this would be a way to sex the fish and if there were any patterns for gender aggression.
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re: Agression and Gender

#2
Hi Matt,

in my experience this can vary with discus, I have had both males and females being dominant, but I would say that in the majority of cases it has been the males that have been dominant.

When it comes to angels, and I have kept domestics, wilds and altums, then I have always found that it is the males that are dominant, never the females. These males may be sparring in order to establish territories and you must remember that you are dealing with wild-caughts here in which case the territories will lead to be larger, so you may have to separate these two at some point or else they may shred each other.

Kind regards,

Dirk
Somerset West, South Africa

Re: re: Agression and Gender

#3
Dirk Bellstedt wrote:Hi Matt,

in my experience this can vary with discus, I have had both males and females being dominant, but I would say that in the majority of cases it has been the males that have been dominant.

When it comes to angels, and I have kept domestics, wilds and altums, then I have always found that it is the males that are dominant, never the females. These males may be sparring in order to establish territories and you must remember that you are dealing with wild-caughts here in which case the territories will lead to be larger, so you may have to separate these two at some point or else they may shred each other.

Kind regards,

Dirk
Thanks Dirk!

On the discus, I do notice the females being more submissive...but only after the pair has formed. Leading up to the pairing, the female has always been the one to go crazy and be aggressive. Maybe my fish have been backwards LOL.

Thanks again for the reply, I'll keep watching it. And will hopefully have a video of them soon.
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re: Agression and Gender

#5
I have noticed a difference between dominance and aggression in the group of wild Cuiuni's that I have.

A pair has formed at one end of the tank. The male is definitely the dominant fish but the female is by far the more aggressive. They have taken over one end of the tank the male seems to almost permanenetly have his fins extended as if he is showing off to all the others, staking his claim to the area, but it is actually the female who is more aggressive and chases the other Cuiunis away. Occassonally the male seems to get fed up with the females aggression to the others and pecks her to put her in her place. I can tell he is dominant over her because she will never challenge him and appears to stop her attacks on the others once the male has intervened and told her not to. The male will also move the others away from his speck, but no where near as much as the female does.

At the other end of the tank another pair formed. Again the fish I believed to be the female appeared to be by far the most aggressive in terms of defending the territory. Unfortunately for the male with her, she was more similiar in size to him and didn't seem to have the same respect for her partner that the male at the other end had from his female. So he seemed to be having a slightly more unhappy time from his woman. She appeared dominant over him. I think he was a slightly weaker fish, than the male at the other end because there was another large male in the tank who would challenge him, but would never challenge the dominat male at the other end.

Neither pair have ever spawned. The weaker pair have since split up.
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